Consequences Of The GOP’s “Meatballs” Kavanaugh Confirmation

still from Ivan Reitman's classic summer camp comedy starring Bill Murray - "Meatballs"

by Richard Cameron   Though not on the magnitude of Harold Ramis’ iconic comedy, “Caddyshack” – close to that on the list of America’s favorite movies starring Bill Murray – in his first marquee appearance, is Ivan Reitman’s classic frolic, “Meatballs” Meatballs featured Murray as a senior camp counselor, Tripper Harrison, at Camp Northstar. In one of the most memorable and oft cited episodes in the movie, Harrison improvises a chant intended to stir the competitive spirit of his demoralized camp basketball team against their dominant tournament opponents, Camp Mohawk.…

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The Constitution’s Emoluments Clause – The Case Against Trump?

Night time photo of the Supreme Court building from the outside front looking up the steps leading to the entrance

by Paul Hamlin Emoluments, seems like a strange word in modern conversation and it is a confusing word when applied to modern politics.  This idea has come back to the forefront of the national political conversation, and as always there are several interpretations and several different solutions based primarily on what side of the political isle you find yourself on. If we try to take off our partisan hats and look at all sides of the emoluments clause and the constitution, what does that look like? Benjamin Franklin’s Snuffbox European…

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Why Did Justice Kennedy Retire Now? – The More Or Less Likely Answers

Donald Trump and outgoing Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy at public event

by Tony Wyman For the only perceived swing-vote justice on the United States Supreme Court to suddenly announce his retirement just months before the crucial November elections couldn’t be worse news for Democrats hoping a Blue Wave is going wash away Republican majorities in the House and Senate. Now, thanks to the opening Justice Anthony Kennedy has made, the GOP has an argument to make to get right-wing and center-right voters to the polls in November: turn out to vote so we can get a conservative judge on the Court.…

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The Privacy Crisis – The Perfect Excuse To Restrict Freedom of the Press

by Oletta Branstiter Are you a “media influencer”?  If so, the U.S. government is very interested in your online activities. The Department of Homeland Security needs a private contractor to provide “24/7 access to a password protected, media influencer database, including journalists, editors, correspondents, social media influencers, bloggers etc.” in order to “identify any and all media coverage related to the Department of Homeland Security or a particular event.” from Forbes.com Hmmm. Couldn’t anything be considered a “particular event”? Haven’t we all become “bloggers”?  According to the Forbes article, “the United…

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50 Years After MLK’s Assassination – A Tale Of Four Cities, Memphis To Beijing

video still of the Reverend Martin Luther King delivering his "I have been to the Mountaintop" oration in Memphis on April 3, 1968

by Richard Cameron Memphis and Martin Luther King’s Assassination On this day, 50 years ago, the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was shot to death. He had come to Memphis, Tennessee the day prior, to join in solidarity with Black city sanitation workers. They and King were known as ‘Negroes’ at the time – and that was the more polite term. The men were on strike to protest unequal pay and dangerous work conditions. While whites were paid even if they stayed home during severe weather events, blacks would be…

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Our Nation’s Foundations – Lesson Ten: Judicial Branch

by Oletta Branstiter One of the three equal but separate branches of our government is the Judicial Branch. Its purpose is inscribed above the entrance to the Supreme Court Building: “Equal Justice Under the Law.” Add summaries of the following information to a second third of the roof of your graphic. The Judicial Branch of our government currently consists of nine Supreme Court Justices and many federal court judges that are nominated by the President and approved by the Senate. These justices and judges may serve for life. The number of…

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Supreme Court’s Review Of Wisconsin Gerrymandering Case Could Lead To More Balanced Governance

visual depictions of strangely constructed congressional districts

by Tony Wyman The U.S. Supreme Court is about to take up a gerrymandering case from Wisconsin that could have an enormous impact on American political elections for decades to come. The case, Gill vs Whitford, is under appeal after a lower court decided Wisconsin’s 2016 redistricting plan constituted an “unconstitutional partisan gerrymander” and gave the GOP an unfair advantage in future political races. What is gerrymandering? Wiki defines gerrymandering as, “in the process of setting electoral districts, gerrymandering is a practice intended to establish a political advantage for a…

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