The Robin Williams Effect: Why Celebrity Deaths Lead To An Increase In Suicides

Robin Williams meme with photo of Williams and text from his quote about sadness and why depressed people often make a greater effort to please others

by Tony Wyman After comedian Robin Williams committed suicide on August 11, 2014, the number of people in America who took their own lives increased 10% over the next five months. Suicide prevention experts call this phenomenon “The Robin Williams Effect” and worry that media coverage of a celebrity’s suicide might be the catalyst that pushes others thinking about taking their own lives over the edge.  If celebrities, with all their fame, adoring fans, remarkable wealth and limitless opportunities can’t find happiness, the thinking goes of a person considering suicide,…

Read More

When Pain Becomes Government Regulated, We Are All Potential Victims

photo of prescription opioid bottles. Recently published opioid therapy clinical practice guideline aims to improve quality of care and patient safety when treating acute and chronic pain. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Hailey R. Staker)

By Janice Barlow with Richard Cameron No one should doubt that we’re still in the midst of an opioid crisis and have been for the better part of a decade. The nature of the crisis, however, is not what you have been led to believe by mass media reports and federal authorities.  Opioid medications have been part of treatment regimens for several decades. But in recent years, the line between who needs them to alleviate chronic or acute pain and who wants them because of the pleasant side effects, has become…

Read More